Edward Franko, stage director
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"Stage Director Edward Franko's conception of the opera was brilliant. creating a seamless flow for the drama."
Robert de Vrij, Opera Canada review of The Rake's Progress


"The staging by director Edward Franko -spare but with a sense of urgency and immediacy captures much of the strength in the W.H. Auden libretto."
Jon Kaplan, NOW Magazine review of The Rake's Progress


"Stage Direction by Edward Franko was clean and free of contrivance."
Robert de Vrij, Opera Canada review of The Medium


"Edward cleverly manipulates the setting to provide often unexpected, comic relief.
He keeps the action on track so the audience really doesn't need to study the Italian opera's English surtitles too much."

Anglea Blackburn, Mississauga News review of Cosi Fan Tutte
"A clever Canadian spin by director Edward Franko. Franko's premise allows for lots of laughs."
Paula Citron, Opera Canada, review of Cosi Fan Tutte
"Edward Franko's vision was terrific."
Paula Citron, Classical 96 FM review of The Consul
"Stage Director Edward Franko made excellent use of the minimal and effective sets."
Robert deVrij, Opera Canada review of The Consul
"Stage Director Edward Franko has done a wonderful job of deploying people.
He found ways to stylize things where they ought to be stylized, and to be realistic where they have to be."

Richard Ouzounian, CBC Radio review of The Consul
"Edward Franko has a definite vision. He directed with a nice bit of economy and there was a nice sense of urgency."
Paula Citron, CFMX review of The Consul
"Songspiel was staged by tenor Edward Franko in a manner faithful to the Brechtian tradition.
Lee Ferguson, The Strand review of Mahagonny Songspiel
"Edward Franko's unfussy stage direction always found the humour in the work without gimmickry."
Christopher Hoile, Stage-Door.org review of Lucas et Cecile
"Edward Franko's staging, meanwhile, made you forget how small the Glenn Gould Studio stage actually is."
Tamara Bernstein, National Post review of Lucas et Cecile
"Director Edward Franko, making the most of minimal props, brings believability to the fakery. He maintains cohesion despite cuts."
Geoff Chapman, Toronto Star review of The Medium at Summerworks Festival

"Edward Franko’s insightful direction gave dramatic shape to Anne’s inner thoughts."
Christopher Hoile, Opera Canada review of The Diary of Anne Frank


"Halifax Summer Workshop staged Mark Adamo's Little Women in a heart-warming production well directed by Edward Franko."
Daphna Levit, Opera Canada review of Little Women


"The new Canadian opera Frankenstein deserves a shelf life. TrypTych, the little company that could,
has mounted the world premiere in a church basement on a miniscule budget, but director Edward Franko makes the opera work."
Paula Citron, Classical 96 Website, review of Frankenstein


"Director and designer Edward Franko worked wonders in staging such a work on a microscopic budget.
The performance was enthusiastically received."
Christopher Hoile, The Wholenote Blog, review of Frankenstein


"Artistic Director Edward Franko made the opera work by staging the narrative with simplicity and no surprises.
He created a playing area in cavernous hall by means of risers for the stage and baffles and curtains surrounding the audience to capture the sound."
Paula Citron, Opera Canada, review of Frankenstein


"Edward Franko (Goro) was also convincing as the mainly unscrupulous, but somewhat amusing, marriage broker. He also looked the part in his kimono."
Daphna Levit, Opera Canada, review of Madama Butterfly, Maritime Concert Opera


Edward Franko is to be commended for his largely successful staging of Les Dialogues. He eschews a period setting for a contemporary one, and manages it quite well. An aristocrat enters haltingly, using a metal walker, as if the collapse of the social order has crippled him physically and emotionally. The prioress meets her death in a modern, if rudimentary, infirmary. The locales, indicated through lighting and a few set pieces, are not as well defined as they might have been, but most of his directorial choices are bold and effective. Breaking the proscenium and having his actors enter and even sing from the audience is particularly successful. His attention to the acting pays off superbly for his cast and for the audience; even the smallest roles embody some action or relation to a scene’s main players.
Hugo Dann, Wayves.ca, Review of Dialogue of the Carmelites, HSOW